Why?

Why use Catholic Textbook Project textbooks? Some of the reasons include:

  • Improved reading levels & student engagement
  • Exceptionally rigorous standards of historic research
  • Inclusive of Catholic contributions over 2,000 years of history
  • Superior Historic Accuracy

IMPROVED READING LEVELS AND STUDENT ENGAGEMENT

In the Archdiocese of Chicago, inner city Catholic school students became so engaged in the pioneering, narrative style of Catholic Textbook Project’s (CTP) History textbooks that they dramatically improved their reading levels.

Engagement of students is paramount. The editors of the Catholic Textbook Project are convinced that story is the most effective way of presenting history to students.

Time and again we have received letters, emails and calls from educators who are grateful that our textbooks engage student—and teacher—interest. Students’ reading levels improve, as does their retention of historical facts. Students come to understand that we, too, as Catholics, have a role to play in impacting tomorrow’s history.

CTP TEXTBOOKS FOLLOW—AND EXCEED—RIGOROUS  STANDARDS

“Other middle and high school history textbooks lack the qualities that Catholic Textbook Project’s offer,” says Jeffrey Burton Russell, Professor of History, Emeritus, University of California, Santa Barbara. Historical facts, he continues, are “…beautifully and clearly presented, without proselytizing, and without pressing any worldview other than the importance of understanding the past.“

“Teachers and students who use the Catholic Textbook Project series… will know more about history than many of their professors as well as most of their classmates,” Dr. Russell adds.

INCLUSIVE OF CATHOLIC CONTRIBUTIONS

In addition to standard secular history, these history textbooks include the significant historical impact of saints, religious orders, and lay Catholic men and women throughout the past 2,000 years.

SUPERIOR HISTORICAL ACCURACY

For example, will your Catholic students learn the following?

  • Copernicus was not only a renown Renaissance mathematician and astronomer who formulated a model of the universe that placed the Sun rather than the Earth at its center, but also a Polish university professor and a Catholic priest
  • The first university in North America was not Harvard (1636), but rather the Roman Catholic University of Mexico (1551)

See Related Links…